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Strong For What?

Facebook pops up some gems sometimes.

I have to say I’m spending less and less time on there.

I’m part of so many “secret” and “hidden” groups that when I am on I rarely look at anything outside of the activity within these groups.

To be fair, the content and people using said groups are the reason I began using facebook in the first place. To connect with and learn from people that are at the top of their fields.

I was never interested in the “social” side of social media. I’m not really a social kind of guy.

It’s weird that these days my facebook page is now one of those pages people go to for the same reasons I go to other peoples.

But anyhow, there’s a legend of the strength and conditioning field, a guy thats been around for ever training many of the top athletes of the time.

And his name of Vern Gambetta.

And Vern says this:


“Keep asking yourself – Strong for what? Develop strength you can use, not strength you can measure” – Vern Gambetta

This is such a Wild Geese idea I had to share it.

As much as I despise the nonsense espoused by the “functional” crowd, I’m going to use the term.

Your training should be functional.

i.e. Fit for purpose.

If you don’t have a purpose, what the hell are you training for? And how can it functional if you don’t define the function?

It’s an idea I almost had beat into the head of one of my BJJ players a while ago. He was so desperate for a 200kg deadlift, his BJJ performance started to suffer. He realised his error and told me he no longer wanted to hit that magic number.

He’ll get it.

We’re just now prioritising his BJJ performance and not his Deadlift performance. He’ll get the 200, I’ve no doubt, it’ll just take longer.

And there’s no harm in that.

I also don’t allow many of my clients to do pull ups ( <—- Controversial!!! )

But they work on the regressions from a pull up that hit the weak points that they’d compensate straight through if left to work full range.

Like these:


Not in every case, but in many.

It’s all about looking at the clients as individuals, assessing the athletes/clients needs and not having them do anything for the sake of simply doing something.

When i talk about assessing needs, I’m talking about the combination of all information collected from their body language, stance, gait, movement, history and of course what they tell you. Be that just from them coming in to the regular group sessions or from a highly detailed AiM Postural Assessment (which I insist on for all my private clients and competitors)

I’ll wrote more on assessments in a future blog post.

Till then

Dave Hedges www.WG-Fit.com

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#PullUp #strength #VernGambetta